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Stories for Tuesday, 26 May 2015
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Low-income families hardest hit by Federal budget   
Produced by Melissa Lahoud

The government is enjoying a popularity boost after its second budget, which is seen as softer and fairer, compared to last year. This is good news for many high income families. But it seems the benefits don’t extend to those who need it the most.

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Prescription addiction   
Produced by Maria Nguyen-Emmett

Prescription medications are killing more Australians than illicit drugs or alcohol. Medical groups have called for the urgent roll-out of a national, real-time, prescription monitoring system in the hopes to prevent people doctor-shopping or ordering from overseas.

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PReP could end mother to child HIV transmission   
Produced by Jake Morcom

The HIV transmission rate from mother to child is incredibly low under the control of proper anti-retroviral treatments, one in particular - PReP. Currently, PReP is only available in a trial situation and can cost upwards of $800 for a months dosage. The chance of passing on the HIV virus is a big concern to any sero-discordant couple, so this new medication could mean wonders for families around Australia.

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Moving off the electrical grid: is it worth it?   
Produced by Catherine Zengerer & Jake Morcom

Innovations like Tesla's Powerwall battery allow you to store the energy you make in solar panels, proving to be a threat to the business model electricity companies we rely on. Those who have turned to solar energy normally do it for ideological or green reasons, but some evidence indicates its more of a financial burden than anticipated. A symposium held in Sydney looked at how Intelligent Grids may be the energy of our future.

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Sight For All Film Night   
Produced by Catherine Zengerer & Jake Morcom

Of the 1.4 million children living with blindness around the world, more than half of these cases were easily preventable. The developing world is home to 90% of the world’s blind, where a lack of eye doctors available and people not visiting hospitals means chances of treatment are often too late.

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