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Stories for Monday, 4 May 2015
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AFP acting in self interest, say lawyers   
Produced by Catherine Zengerer

The Australian Federal Police finally fronted the media today to defend their actions in the Bali 9 case. They say with the knowledge they had at the time they would not have acted any differently today, despite their revised guidelines as it is their job to protect Australians from drug smugglers. But the Australian Lawyer's Alliance says they were acting in self interest - putting their need for a result ahead of what was the right thing to do.

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Deficit blowout now $45bn - must cut spending says government   
Produced by Roderick Chambers

Chris Richardson of Deloittes Access Economics has forecast an extra $14bn to bring the deficit up to $45billion for budget 2015. PM Tony Abbott is still committed to working up a surplus - but when? There are many revenue pressures, but raising more revenue is anathema to the Liberals rhetoric. So where will the cuts in this "boring" budget turn up?

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How can we prevent preventable asthma deaths?   
Produced by Kenji Sato

Asthma is a serious and potentially life threatening condition. Asthma Australia says the majority of deaths caused by asthma could have been prevented. In order to tackle this issue, Asthma Australia is holding a national conference.

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Victorian government inquiry to decide whether homework is useful   
Produced by Stephanie Amir and Catherine Zengerer

Students find it boring. Parents find it stressful. Teachers don’t always value it, and academics say that it doesn't lead to better academic outcomes in the younger years. So, why do Australian schools give homework to students in primary school and early high school? Giving homework is something that has just 'always been done’, but now a Victorian government inquiry is questioning whether it might do students more harm than good.

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‘Sacred’ title eroded from ancient Indigenous art   
Produced by Ninah Kopel

The Burrup peninsula is home to the world’s largest and oldest collection of rock art. It was once considered sacred by the Western Australian Government. Now only select areas are considered sacred. There are more than 2,400 registered Aboriginal sites on the Burrup Peninsula, but with ancient art covering the whole region, deregistered areas mean sights of culture could fall through the gaps.

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